Commentary

By: Editor

We are living in storied times. A time of stories that will shape our history.

When I grew up, in the 60s everyone was fearful of a nuclear war. The Cuban Missile Crisis was in all the news and the Earth held its breath.

By: Fr. Douglas K. Clark
Originally Appeared in : Vol. 100 No. 03

In the first four Beatitudes, the Lord Jesus sets out the qualities of those invited to the Kingdom of Heaven. These “congratulations” are completely contrary to what Christ’s hearers would have expected to hear.

By: MONSIGNOR FRED J. NIJEM
Originally Appeared in : Vol. 100 No. 03

I have had brother priests tell me that retirement was great, while others have counseled me otherwise. I am experiencing some of the truth of each opinion. Here is what I have discovered so far. One size does not fit all. Everyone, lay and clergy, has their own reason for retiring. Some have reached a certain age where retirement is mandatory, some have just gotten tired of the 9-to-5 routine.

By: Father Kenneth Doyle (CNS)
Originally Appeared in : 9924-11/21/19

Q. At the Last Supper, Jesus told the apostles to take his body and his blood. But Christ knew that Judas was in a state of serious sin. So how could he have let him receive? (Alexandria, Louisiana)

 

A. Scripture scholars indicate that there is room for debate as to whether Judas was still present at the Last Supper after Jesus had instituted the Eucharist. Luke’s account (22:17-23) would lead one to believe that Judas did share in consuming Christ’s body and blood.

 

By: Padre Pablo Migone
Originally Appeared in : 9924-11/21/19

De los muchos sacerdotes que me enseñaron en el seminario, el más alegre fue un fraile dominico irlandés, el Padre Paul Murray. Era un hombre de oración intensa, fiel a la iglesia y siempre listo para compartir alguna historia. En uno de sus cursos titulados "Dios y los poetas" hablamos de la presencia del humor en la Biblia. También consideramos algunos pasajes de Santo Tomas de Aquino en los cuales el Padre Murray encontró rastros de humor en las obras del gran teólogo.

 

By: Father Douglas K. Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9924-11/21/19

On the day of his resurrection, that first Easter, the Risen Christ accompanied two of his disciples, one of whom was named Cleopas (the other’s name is unknown), on their way to Emmaus, about seven miles from Jerusalem. So disheartened were they by the gruesome death of Jesus of Nazareth and so baffled by reports that “some women from our group” had found his tomb empty and that they “had seen a vision of angels who announced that he was alive,” that they simply did not recognize the stranger in their midst.

By: Father Douglas K. Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9923-11/7/19

Two weeks ago, I mentioned “the puzzling optics of an informal interreligious prayer service held in the Vatican Gardens on the Memorial of Saint Francis of Assisi (also on Oct. 4),” which I thought distracted from the important theme of the Synod on the Amazon, that is, “inculturation.”

 

By: Deacon Robert Larcher
Originally Appeared in : 9922-10/24/19

The recent Pew Study on the beliefs of Catholics revealed some truly disturbing responses regarding the truth of the real presence of our Lord in the Eucharist. And, of course, the secular media had a field day headlining “63% of Catholics don’t believe.…” When the wise reader digs a bit deeper to check the methodology of the study, that wise one finds that among active Catholics who attend Mass weekly, 69% of them accepted the Real Presence, and 17% said they didn’t know or were confused. Sadly, 14% rejected the foundation.

 

By: Father Douglas K. Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9922-10/24/19

This has been a very busy month for Pope Francis. On Oct. 4, he ordained four priests as bishops; on Oct. 5, he created 13 new cardinals (10 eligible to vote in conclave)—including one of the newly-ordained bishops; on Oct. 6, he opened the Synod on “Amazonia,” and on Oct. 13, he canonized five new saints, including John Henry Newman. Yet these significant events were overshadowed in some Catholic social media sites by the puzzling optics of an informal interreligious prayer service held in the Vatican Gardens on the Memorial of Saint Francis of Assisi (also on Oct. 4).

 

By: Deacon Robert Larcher
Originally Appeared in : 9921-10/10/19

In today’s Gospel, Mark offers a familiar and powerful narrative for our meditation. Jesus and his disciples have been working hard, and there is a lot of buzz around the Judean countryside. So in a moment of respite, Jesus asks his followers: Who do people say that I am? They repeat what people are saying: Elijah, one of the prophets, or even John the Baptist. But then Jesus asks them directly: Who do you say I am? And once again it is the burly Peter who steps forward with profound faith: You are the Christ, the Messiah, the Savior, the fulfillment of the covenant of our Father.

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