Features

By: Padre Pablo Migone
Originally Appeared in : Vol. 100 No. 03

They came to see if they could get something out of the whole spectacle – if just to keep up with the latest gossip in town. “They scurried about the surrounding country and began to bring in the sick on mats to wherever they heard he was. Whatever villages or towns or countryside he entered, they laid the sick in the marketplaces and begged him that they might touch only the tassel on his cloak.”

By: Padre Pablo Migone
Originally Appeared in : Vol. 100 No. 03

Venían a ver si podían sacar algo de todo el espectáculo, aunque sólo fuera para mantenerse al día con los últimos chismes de la ciudad. “Empezaron a traer a los enfermos en sus camillas al lugar donde él estaba, y en todos los lugares adónde iba, pueblos, ciudades o aldeas, ponían a los enfermos en las plazas y le rogaban que les dejara tocar al menos el fleco de su manto”.

By: Fr. Douglas K. Clark
Originally Appeared in : Vol. 100 No. 03

In the first four Beatitudes, the Lord Jesus sets out the qualities of those invited to the Kingdom of Heaven. These “congratulations” are completely contrary to what Christ’s hearers would have expected to hear.

By: MONSIGNOR FRED J. NIJEM
Originally Appeared in : Vol. 100 No. 03

I have had brother priests tell me that retirement was great, while others have counseled me otherwise. I am experiencing some of the truth of each opinion. Here is what I have discovered so far. One size does not fit all. Everyone, lay and clergy, has their own reason for retiring. Some have reached a certain age where retirement is mandatory, some have just gotten tired of the 9-to-5 routine.

By: Staff
Originally Appeared in : Vol. 100 No. 02

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) lists the advantages for students in Catholic schools in terms of the measurable gains in academic achievements; the development of social benefits and civic-mindedness for the greater community; on-going parental engagement in their child’s education and the practice of the Catholic faith; and the astonishing financial savings and benefits to local, state and federal governments. These advantages are quite impressive and easily quantifiable.

By: Bishop Gregory Hartmayer
Originally Appeared in : Vol. 100 No. 02

Michelangelo regarded his service to the church and the community as a vocation and not merely a job or yet another commission. He approached each work with reverence and humility, seeking to discover rather than create.

For example, as he sculpted, he claimed that he was uncovering a figure that already existed in the marble. He was not chiseling it or molding it according to his set plan but setting it free to be whatever God intended it to be.

By: Padre Pablo Migone
Originally Appeared in : Vol. 100 No. 02

Mientras recorríamos un cami- no de tierra mal cuidado y lleno de baches, miré hacia el cielo y me quedé boquiabierto. Nunca había apreciado algo así, y nunca más he vuelto a apreciar algo así en mi vida. Había millones de luces esparcidas por el cielo nocturno como leche derramada. Era una especie de camino ilumi- nado sobre mí que atravesaba la noche oscura. Las luces eran de diferentes colores e intensidades: blancas, azules e incluso algunas rojas. Era tan espectacular que no podía bajar la mirada. No quería ni pestañear.

By: Father Douglas K. Clark
Originally Appeared in : Vol. 100 No. 02

We will hear from the Book of the Prophet Isaiah 8:23-9:3 (“The people who walked in darkness have seen a great light”), from Saint Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians 1:10- 13, 17 (“For Christ did not send me to baptize but to preach the gospel, and not with the wisdom of human eloquence so that the cross of Christ might not be emptied of its meaning”), and from the Gospel according to Matthew 4:12-23, which sees Jesus’ initial proclamation of the Gospel in Galilee (“Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand”) as the fulfilment of Isaiah’s prophecy announced in the first reading.

By: Liz Fabian
Originally Appeared in : Vol. 100 No. 02

As the sun rose behind the parish’s brick tower that hoists a cross over Macon’s historic African American Pleasant Hill neighborhood, the True Faith Church of God in Christ kitchen staff was frying up sausage and scrambling eggs on the ground floor of the Vineville United Methodist Church.

Peter Claver parishioner Bud Fletcher was greeting folks at the door as he thought back to 1990.

“It was very small in the basement of St. Peter Claver. There wasn’t much room,” said Fletcher, who serves with 11 others on the Martin Luther King, Jr. Breakfast Planning Committee.

By: Rachel Balducci
Originally Appeared in : Vol. 100 No. 02

Charlie’s school is just close enough that it doesn’t feel too painful to make the drive. It’s in a quiet enough town that I don’t feel too overwhelmed at the thought of leaving him there. Also, my boy is having such a good experience in general that I don’t feel too sad when I get back in the car and make the drive home alone.

So many feelings, which is the story of this season.

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