Features

By: Rita H. DeLorme

They died in their prime - one thing they had in common. Starting with Bernard Plunkett in 1854, they were all studying to be priests of the Diocese of Savannah. Archival research revealed their presence in the diocese, but offered few details about them. Except for the more recent death (in 2005) of seminarian Dariusz Zurek, their generous offering of their lives to God as priests is sometimes forgotten. If there’s a list of Savannah seminarians well on their way to priesthood before death intervened, it’s securely hidden. Only four have been found so far.

By: Rita H. DeLorme

You’d think working with stopped-up drains, broken pipes and malfunctioning toilets would be a pretty ordinary career. In the hands of some it might be, but plumbing – as done by Thomas G. Brittingham - wasn’t.  When Brittingham came to Augusta c.1900 to work on the posh Bon Air Hotel that subsequently burned, he probably had no inkling his stay would be so long.

By: Rita H. Delorme

Sacramental records in the Diocesan archives have a way of outlining the lives of people and their families. When George Saraf,  baptized in Turkey in 1896, and Mary Gannam, baptized in New Hampshire in 1910, married at Saint Patrick’s Church in Savannah in 1927, it seemed as if a wonderful, new life was opening up for them. The new Mrs. Saraf’s family, the Gannam’s, was from Syria. This union of two hardworking clans could only bode well. Their second child and first son, Philip John, was baptized at Sacred Heart Church, Savannah, on June 8, 1930.

By: Rita H. Delorme

It was bad in Savannah in 1820. It was worse in 1854. It was worst of all in 1876. Dubbed the “Stranger’s Disease” because of its habit of afflicting new arrivals in the port, this deadly viral disease downed more than its proportionate share of Catholics. Zoning in on Europeans, and generally known as yellow fever, it generated epidemics in 1820, 1854 and 1876 that accounted for 60, 650 and 1,065 deaths, respectively, in Savannah.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Features
Go to top