CNS

By: Junno Arocho Esteves (CNS)
Originally Appeared in : 9817-8/16/18

Vatican City (CNS)--Being a Christian isn’t just about not doing evil, but it is a daily exercise in loving others through good works and deeds, Pope Francis said.
Many times, Christians can be tempted to “think they are saints” and justify themselves by saying, “I don’t harm anyone,” the pope told thousands of Italian young adults August 12.

 

By: Cindy Wooden (CNS)
Originally Appeared in : 9817-8/16/18

Vatican City (CNS)--A Jesuit priest who has been on the frontline of advocating for survivors of clerical sexual abuse and developing detailed programs to prevent abuse said the crisis unfolding, again, in the United States is a summons to a new way of envisioning the Church and taking responsibility for it.

 

By: Junno Arocho Esteves (CNS)
Originally Appeared in : 9817-8/16/18

Vatican City--Like the ancient Israelites, Christians today also can fall into the temptation of creating their own idols when difficulties and uncertainties arise, Pope Francis said.

 

"To escape precariousness human nature looks for a 'do-it-yourself' religion. If God does not show himself, we create a tailor-made god," the pope said August 8 during his weekly general audience.

 

By: Junno Arocho Esteves (CNS)
Originally Appeared in : 9817-8/17/18

Ciudad del vaticano--Igual que los israelitas antiguos, los cristianos de hoy también pueden caer en la tentación de crear sus propios ídolos cuando surgen las dificultades y las incertidumbres, dijo el papa Francisco.

 

"La naturaleza humana, para escapar de la precariedad ... busca una religión 'hazlo tú mismo'. Si Dios no aparece, nos hacemos un Dios a medida", dijo el papa durante su audiencia semanal general del 8 de agosto.

 

By: Jennifer Ficcaglia (CNS)
Originally Appeared in : 9817-8/16/18

CHILDREN'S STORY

One day, Jesus told the apostles a parable to show the importance of watching for the coming of the Son of Man.

 

He told the story of a man who was going on a journey. Before he left, he put his three servants in charge of his possessions.

 

The man gave each servant money according to his ability. The first received five talents, the second received two talents and the third received one talent.

 

After the man left, the first servant immediately traded his talents and made five more.

 

By: Kurt Jensen (CNS)
Originally Appeared in : 9817-8/16/18

Are Catholics more accepting of science than adherents of other religious groups?

 

Yes, an in-depth 2017 survey (1,927 respondents, including 1,010 Catholics) indicated.

 

However — and it’s a big “however” — it’s not an overwhelming difference. Catholics can be just as inconsistent as other adherents when it comes to seeing conflicts between faith and science.

 

By: Christine Bordelon (CNS)
Originally Appeared in : 9816-8/2/18

NEW ORLEANS (CNS)--While the ministry of the deacon has changed in the Catholic Church’s history, Cardinal Joseph W. Tobin of Newark, New Jersey, said deacons today are a sign of what Christians are called to be in their service of God and neighbor.

 

Speaking at the 2018 National Diaconate Congress in New Orleans July 22-26, Cardinal Tobin said the diaconate is absolutely crucial to the Church’s life. Deacons have a threefold ministry of “word, sacrament and charity ... permeated by a commitment to charity and justice.”

 

By: Catholic News Service
Originally Appeared in : 9816-8/2/18

Fifty years ago in issuing his encyclical “Humanae Vitae,” Blessed Paul VI “reaffirmed the beautiful truth that a husband and wife are called to give themselves completely to each other,” said the president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

 

“Marriage reflects the love of God, which is faithful, generous and life-giving. Through their vocation, spouses cooperate with God by being open to new human life,” Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston said in a July 25 statement marking the 50th anniversary of the document.

 

By: Effie Caldarola (CNS)
Originally Appeared in : 9816-8/2/18

Any parent who ever grappled with the “new” math knows that education often falls victim to the latest trend.

 

But one growing trend in Catholic education is actually taking students back to what’s enduring and unchanging, according to Catherine Neumayr, who just completed seven years as principal of Holy Rosary Academy, an independent Catholic classical school in Anchorage, Alaska.

 

By: Jennifer Ficcaglia (CNS)
Originally Appeared in : 9816-8/2/18

CHILDREN’S STORY:
God was upset about the evil ways of King Ahab of Israel. Ahab had married the Sidonian princess Jezebel and began to worship her false god, Baal.

 

One day, God called on his prophet, Elijah, to tell Ahab that there would be no dew or rain in the land except at Elijah’s word.

 

Drought and famine spread through the land for three years. During this time, Elijah was in hiding and Jezebel put the other prophets of God to death.

 

In the third year, God told Elijah to return to Ahab and end the drought.

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