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By: Jason Halcombe
Originally Appeared in : 9706-3/16/17

Only seconds after Magan had picked up the phone long enough to give an irritated, “Hey J,” she made an audible twist away from the microphone and gave a muffled, “So is anybody ready to fess up?” in the direction of the front yard.

 

“What happened now?” I asked.

 

“You’ll have to ask your big boys,” she replied.

 

By: Rachel Balducci
Originally Appeared in : 9706-3/16/17

I’m sitting outside the door of a random classroom in a fine arts building on a college university campus. Inside, my boy Elliott is writing a persuasive essay. He’s one young man in a roomful of high school students who are competing in the state-level competition for our private school literary association.

 

By: Padre Pablo Migone
Originally Appeared in : 9706-3/16/17

La parábola del hijo pródigo debe ser la más conocida de la Biblia, quizás sólo le ganaría la del buen samaritano. Esta es una historia simple pero con un mensaje siempre aplicable que ha cautivado a innumerables cristianos y no cristianos por igual. ¿Qué hace esta historia tan potente y atractiva?

Generaciones de hombres y mujeres han encontrado esperanza y aliento en la experiencia de la conversión del joven que insultó a su padre pidiendo su herencia, mal usó sus dones y talentos, y luego regresó a casa de su padre con intenciones no perfectas.

 

By: Father Pablo Migone
Originally Appeared in : 9706-3/16/17

The Parable of the Prodigal Son may be the best known in the Bible, perhaps only rivaled by the Parable of the Good Samaritan. It is a simple yet timeless story that has captivated countless Christians and non-Christians alike. What makes this story so powerful and attractive?

Generations of men and women have found hope and encouragement in the conversion experience of the young man who insulted his father by asking for his inheritance, misused his gifts and talents and then returned to his father’s house with intentions that were far from perfect. 

By: Jason Halcombe
Originally Appeared in : 9705-3/2/17

Magan read somewhere that homeschooled children have a hard time walking in straight lines because, unlike their public school counterparts, they aren’t asked to march single file from class to class or to and from recess or lunch day after day.

 

That might explain why afternoon strolls through our neighborhood end up with me repeating, “a straight line, not a flat line,” as any number of our walkers spread out across the road instead of keeping to the curb.

 

Now imagine that stroll from the training room to the altar.

 

By: Rachel Swenson Balducci
Originally Appeared in : 9705-3/2/17

I have a weird and twisted love of laundry. It’s one of the most relaxing chores I have, and one of the reasons it works so well for me is that I’ve developed a system that is peaceful and easy. The way I do business means laundry is rarely backed up and we are almost never looking for the clothes we need. They are always magically in the laundry baskets, waiting for the next round of use.

 

By: Father Pablo Migone
Originally Appeared in : 9705-3/2/17

By: Padre Pablo Migone
Originally Appeared in : 9705-3/2/17

Hace un tiempo escuché en el radio que en la actualidad dos tercios de los ordeñadores de vacas en los Estados Unidos son inmigrantes indocumentados. Ya que soy descendiente de cuatro 

By: Jason Halcombe
Originally Appeared in : Issue 9704, Feb. 16, 2017 on p. 13

Kickoff between the Atlanta Falcons and Green Bay Packers was still about two hours away, but everyone in the Halcombe household was already busy prepping game-time snacks, sporting red and black and hopeful the home team would come away with a victory an

By: Rachel Swenson Balducci
Originally Appeared in : Issue 9704, Feb. 16, 2017 on p. 13

Henry woke up feeling sick the other day. Three of his four older brothers had been ill the day before, and it seems Henry got a combination of the stomach, sinus and head issues the other boys had suffered.

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