columns

By: Father Pablo Migone
Originally Appeared in : 9917-8/15/19

I have only seen a sign forbidding visitors to smile or laugh in a public place once in my life. The site had no guards actively enforcing the rule, but the simple recounting of the horrific acts that unfolded at the site was enough to keep a person from smiling. What horrible thing could have happened in a place that forbids smiling and laughing? 

 

By: Rachel Balducci
Originally Appeared in : 9917-8/15/19

Paul and I are about to celebrate our 25th anniversary of getting married. That is just mind– blowing. In honor of this blessed, special, humbling occasion, I’d like to reflect on a few things I’ve learned in my years as a wife.

 

1. Love hurts. I don’t know why that’s the first thing that comes to mind, but it’s true. Love hurts because it costs everything.

 

By: Jason Halcombe
Originally Appeared in : 9917-8/15-19

Summer is great for swimming, grilling and vacationing, but it’s horrible for little people who thrive on routine.

 

That may explain why Magan starts our school year the second week of July.

 

By: Padre Pablo Migone

 Sólo una vez en mi vida he visto un aviso que prohíba sonreír o reír en un lugar público. Este lugar no tenía vigilantes para imponer esta disposición, pero el simple escuchar los relatos de los terribles hechos ocurridos ahí era suficiente para impedir una sonrisa o carcajada. ¿Qué atrocidades pudieron haber ocurrido para prohibir una sonrisa?

 

By: Rachel Balducci
Originally Appeared in : 9916-8/1/19

I’m writing this column in the middle of a trial. I don’t like writing through things like this, I prefer to be on the other side before I try and articulate feelings and emotions. But here I am, on deadline, and in the middle of something difficult and scary.

 

By: Jason Halcombe
Originally Appeared in : 9916-8/1/19

My Uncle Steve once gave my dad a coffee cup inscribed with Murphy’s Law...upside down. To a young boy, it took me a minute to understand why putting “If anything can go wrong, it will” upside down on a mug was funny but it obviously left an indelible mark.

 

By: Father Pablo Migone
Originally Appeared in : 9916-8/1/19

This morning I listened to a fascinating story on the radio about the inner workings of the mind. The scientist interviewed described a recent study he conducted that yielded shocking results: people who make concrete, irrevocable choices are happier than those who prefer leaving their options open and fail to choose definitively one thing over another. The scientist was so surprised with the findings of his research that he went home and proposed to his girlfriend with whom he had lived for ten years. He now joyfully states that he is happier than before, and loves her more than ever.

By: Padre Pablo Migone
Originally Appeared in : 9916-8/1/19

Esta mañana escuché en la radio un fascinante reportaje sobre el funcionamiento de la mente humana. El científico que fue entrevistado describió un reciente estudio que realizó el cual produjo resultados sorprendentes: las personas que toman decisiones concretas e irrevocables son más felices que aquellas que prefieren mantener varias opciones abiertas sin elegir definitivamente una cosa sobre otra. El científico quedó tan impresionado con los resultados de su investigación que inmediatamente le propuso matrimonio a su novia con quien había cohabitado por diez años.

By: Father Pablo Migone
Originally Appeared in : 9915-7/18/19

Editor’s note: This column is newsworthy as a first person account of the ordinations in Nigeria. It has been translated into Spanish here.

 

By: Rachel Balducci
Originally Appeared in : 9915-7/18/19

Our son Augie left for his summer mission trip a few days ago. He joined the other students in his class for a few weeks of serving with the Missionaries of Charity up in Jenkins, Kentucky. 

 

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