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By: Jason Halcombe
Originally Appeared in : 9910-5/9/19

While the Lenten season sacrifices of soda, dessert, and socks at our house had been ongoing for 40 days and 40 nights, sunset on Holy Saturday had officially signaled the start of Easter celebrations and an unexpected nighttime egg hunt.

 

By: Padre Pablo Migone
Originally Appeared in : 9910-5/9/19

“Lamenta recuerdos perdidos que nunca se realizaron. Lamenta aquello que nunca fue. Lamenta recuerdos que no posees. Lamenta el momento presente que no fue destinado a existir”. Escribí estas palabras en el 2010 mientras estaba sentado en la banca trasera de la Parroquia Saint Joseph en Washington, Georgia. La última vez que había entrado a esta pequeña parroquia rural fue unos pocos días antes de que mi hermano fuera diagnosticado con cáncer a fines de diciembre de 1995. Esa Navidad yo iba a tocar el piano durante la Misa, pero nunca llegamos.

 

By: Father Pablo Migone
Originally Appeared in : 9909-4/25/19

When I made my first communion, I received many gifts from friends and family members. Among them was a rectangular, light brown ceramic plaque with praying hands on one corner and the following words, “God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.”

 

By: Rachel Balducci
Originally Appeared in : 9909-4/25/19

A few years ago, one of my brothers decided to stop drinking alcohol. It was a personal choice which he explained as “wanting to see the world through that lens” — the lens of sobriety. My brother had gotten tired of drinking a few beers at every event he attended, and then waking up feeling bad or tired or (worst of all) worried about something he had said the night before.

 

By: Jason Halcombe
Originally Appeared in : 9909-4/25/19

It may be hard to imagine, but there was once a time in our family’s history where we had twice as many cats as we did children.

 

Before you break out your abacus or start calling the local Humane Society to file a complaint on our behalf, know that these were the early days BJL: Before Jesse Luke.

 

By: Padre Pablo Migone
Originally Appeared in : 9909-4/25/19

Cuando hice mi primera comunión recibí muchos regalos de amigos y parientes. Entre ellos había una placa rectangular marrón de cerámica con unas manos unidas en oración en una esquina junto con las siguientes palabras, “Dios concédeme la serenidad para aceptar las cosas que no puedo cambiar, el valor para cambiar las cosas que puedo, y la sabiduría para reconocer la diferencia.” Esta oración ha estado colgada en mi dormitorio por todos estos años.

 

By: Father Pablo Migone
Originally Appeared in : 9908-4/11/19

The Parable of the Prodigal Son is perhaps the best known story of the whole Bible, rivaled only by the Parable of the Good Samaritan. It is a simple yet timeless story that has captivated generations of Christians and non-Christians alike. What makes this parable so appealing is the hope that it transmits. Generations of men and women have found hope and encouragement in the conversion experience of the young man who insulted his father by asking for his inheritance, misused his gifts and talents, and then returned to his father’s house with intentions that were far from perfect.

By: Rachel Balducci
Originally Appeared in : 9908-4/11/19

One of my favorite pictures from the trip Paul and I took to the Holy Land was the very first picture I snapped. Paul and I, smiling into the camera: I’m holding a glass of champagne — and we both have gigantic Ash Wednesday ashes on our foreheads.

 

By: Jason Halcombe
Originally Appeared in : 9908-4/11/19

Let me preface this by saying that if it were up to Magan, this entire entry into the annals of large family living would never have happened in the first place, including me making my daughter cry, because the device in question for all of the ruckus in our living room would not exist in our house in the first place.

 

By: Padre Pablo Migone
Originally Appeared in : 9908-4/11/19

La parábola del hijo pródigo es quizás la más conocida de toda la Biblia, en competencia solamente con la Parábola del Buen Samaritano. Es una historia simple pero duradera que ha cautivado a generaciones de cristianos y no cristianos por igual. Lo que hace tan atractiva esta parábola es la esperanza que transmite. Generaciones de hombres y mujeres han encontrado esperanza y aliento en la conversión del joven que insultó a su padre al pedir su herencia, malgastó sus dones y talentos y regresó a la casa de su padre con intenciones nada perfectas.

 

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