Commentary

By: Father Douglas K. Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9713-6/22/17

As I write this message, I have tears in my eyes. I have just returned from the Ogeechee Area Hospice, where my friend, Father Mike Smith, has been staying since Tuesday morning, June 13. He had been so frail at Mass on Sunday, that his friend, Father Tom Nellis, the celebrant, had to bring Holy Communion to Father Mike in his pew. The next day, they hosted a Jesus Caritas group of priests, who prayed over Father Mike and anointed him (again). That evening, he collapsed and could not get up, so Tuesday, he was taken to hospice.

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9713-6/22/17

“Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me.” This refrain echoes from my childhood. But, as is often the case with popular “proverbs,” there’s no truth in the statement. The pain of a verbal attack can endure long after physical injury has healed. 

 

While most people with compassion are quick to denounce physical attacks, some hesitate when they witness verbal abuse. We make excuses for the abuser: “He’s just joking.” “She’s speaking out of anger.” “He didn’t really mean it.” “She’s being misinterpreted.”

 

By: Father Brett Brannen
Originally Appeared in : 9713-6/22/17

Perhaps you have read the article “Surprising Mercy” by Christopher West in the book “Beautiful Mercy,” which was given to all of our parishioners at Easter. Excerpts from the article:

 

By: Father Douglas K. Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9712-6/8/17

When I was a kid in Ohio, I experienced four distinct seasons each year: the harsh but beautiful snowy winters, the spring with its flowers and rain, the “lazy, hazy days of summer,” and the fall with the gorgeous foliage of deciduous trees. While each had its virtues, I definitely did not prefer the winters, largely because I was usually “under the weather” with colds, and a bit blue from the darkness of the skies.

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9712-6/8/17

Much focus in American society is given to winning. Elections, championships, competitions of all kinds. When someone wins the lottery, we uniformly celebrate. A win inspires us all to keep trying, against all odds.

 

We want to win wars, arguments, contests, prizes, sales, awards, praise, and respect. When we win, we feel vindicated. We feel affirmed in our abilities. We feel honored. We feel encouraged.

 

By: Father Douglas K. Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9711-5/25/17

Every year, Catholics spend over 90 days preparing for and celebrating the Paschal Mystery, the dying and rising of Jesus Christ: during the 40+ days of Lent, the three days of the Paschal Triduum and the 50-day Easter season that lasts through Pentecost, the dies pentecostes (“fiftieth day”). The Good News of Christ’s Resurrection is so good that Christians feast for 10 days more during the Easter Season than they fast during Lent! 

 

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9711-5/25/17

In the more than 60 years I’ve lived, war, or the shadow of war, has been part of my life. A child of the 50s, as soon as I could speak, I pronounced “I like Ike,” a candidate my father, a World War II veteran, had met during his service and enthusiastically endorsed. 

 

By: Father Douglas K. Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9710-5/11/17

On June 4, the Catholic Church will celebrate the Solemnity of Pentecost, the fiftieth and last day of the Easter season. For Saint Luke, writing in his second work, the Acts of the Apostles, the first Pentecost celebrated by the Jewish people after Christ’s Resurrection was the occasion for a spectacular outpouring of the Holy Spirit on the Lord’s disciples gathered behind closed doors in the Upper Room in Jerusalem “with some women and Mary the mother of Jesus and his brothers.” They “were all in one place together” when “suddenly there came from the sky a noise like a strong 

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9710-5/11/17

Catholics are often encouraged to examine their consciences for sacramental confession based on the Ten Commandments. If the Christians of our nation were to collectively examine our consciences based on the Ten Commandments, what sins may be revealed? 

 

“I am the Lord thy God, thou shalt not have any strange gods before Me.” 

By: Father Douglas K. Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9710-5/11/17

Early in 2005, I was the editor of this newspaper and a priest in residence at the Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist in Savannah. A year earlier I was asked by Benedictine Military School and Saint Vincent’s Academy to direct a play, which led to the creation of a joint theater program that continues to this day. 

 

 

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