Commentary

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9921-10/10/19

I have just finished reading Douglas Murray’s new book, The Madness of Crowds, a trenchant critique of the push to “identify” ourselves as narrowly as possibly by race, gender, sexual orientation, etc.  Murray essentially argues that the divisions between the current advocates for the “communities” currently in the limelight threaten to undermine our common humanity and thus do not provide a firm foundation for a new “post-modern” (“post-Judeo-Christian”?) ethic.

 

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9920-9/26/19

In 1993, I was asked to write a family life column for the Catholic Miscellany newspaper of the Diocese of Charleston. At that time, my four children were ages two through 10, and my Catholic faith and the opportunity to write were great gifts in my life. A convert to Catholicism, I had studied writing in my college and graduate years.

 

By: Father Douglas K. Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9920-9/26/19

The Catholic News Service (CNS) reported a few weeks ago that “a Pew Research Center survey released Aug. 5 found that nearly 70% of Catholics believe that the bread and wine used for Communion during Mass are ‘symbols of the body and blood of Jesus Christ,’ while about 30% believe that the bread and wine ‘actually become’ Christ’s body and blood.”

 

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9918-8/29/19

Imagine if it were determined that 20% of mass killers were afflicted with diabetes. Imagine if the public discourse revolved around diabetes being a factor that prompted them to commit their horrific crimes. On the face of it, the idea of blaming diabetes for mass murder seems absurd and insulting to people who have diabetes. But the same argument is being made about mental illness and gun violence, linking horrific massacres to people who suffer from mental illness.

By: Father Douglas K. Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9917-8/15/19

When Jerusalem was destroyed by the Babylonians in 587 b.c., the Judean captives gathered in Ramah before being driven to exile in Babylon (Jeremiah 40:1). Inspired by God, the prophet Jeremiah wrote about this gathering: 

 

“A voice is heard in Ramah, mourning and great weeping, Rachel weeping for her children and refusing to be comforted, because they are no more.”—Jeremiah 31:15

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9917-8/15/19

I recently saw a small news article on the website of a regional news station. It caught my eye because the county where I live was named in the title. A local firefighter lost his job after posting what the article’s title described as “controversial” comments on Facebook. After reading the article itself, I was appalled that the news reporter had used the word “controversial” to describe the firefighter’s comments. 

 

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9916-8/1/19

In an adult faith formation group, we were recently discussing the nature of Christian love. How can we love people we don’t know? How can we love our enemies? How can we love people who have harmed us?

 

The conversation was sparked by this passage from the Gospel of John (9-13):

 

By: Father Douglas Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9916-8/1/19

The United States Department of Justice’s Office of Public Affairs announced the following on July 25, 2019: “Attorney General William P.

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9915-7/18/19

I tell myself the reason more people are not horrified by the conditions of detention camps at the southern border is they don’t really understand what’s going on. Clearly no one could rationalize what is happening to innocent children and desperate adults if they understood the trauma these asylum seekers are escaping as well as the trauma they experience on the journey and as they arrive at our border. I’m convinced that more education about what is occurring can help show people the truth, facts that have been surrounded in rhetoric, fearmongering, and lies. 

 

By: Father Douglas K. Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9915-7/18/19

Every year in July, two great nations celebrate the birth of their republics. The United States of America celebrates its Declaration of Independence from Great Britain on July 4, and the French Republic celebrates the storming of the Bastille on July 14. 

 

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