Commentary

By: Father Douglas Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9717-8/17/17

On January 26, 1900, Theodore Roosevelt wrote a letter to Henry L. Sprague, which included this famous sentence: “I have always been fond of the west African proverb, ‘Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far.'” Although scholars have tried in vain to trace this proverb back to its source in west Africa, it expresses T.R.’s unique essence. By 1900, the future U.S.

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9717-8/17/17

I’ve been buying a lot of produce lately, particularly greens. We all know how expensive produce can be, so to save some money, I recently visited a large Asian market. The prices on produce are the best around. I’ve shopped at this market in the past, and I’ve felt a bit overwhelmed. There are so many products with which I’m unfamiliar. Yet each time I visit, I feel more acclimated. 

 

By: Father Douglas Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9716-8/3/17

The Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for Children in London was the beneficiary of a generous gift from Sir J. M. Barrie in 1929: the rights to his masterpiece, Peter Pan. The adventures of the “boy who never grew up” have bankrolled GOSH’s rise to the status of one of the world’s most renowned children’s hospitals. Ironically, GOSH played a key role in blocking the parents of Charlie Gard from seeking treatment elsewhere so that their little boy might have one last chance to grow up.

 

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9716-8/3/17

As we Catholics know, being pro-life means much more than just preventing women from having abortions. As one who’s been involved in the pro-life movement over the years, I’ve witnessed firsthand the care and concern crisis pregnancy centers have offered women who find themselves in dire straits. Indeed, without such help, a pro-life movement would be strictly legalistic, without heart.

 

So it makes sense that those who are pro-life will want to ensure that pregnant women and their babies are provided the best possible medical care. 

 

By: Father Douglas Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9715-7/20/17

According to Saints Matthew, Mark, Luke and Paul, Jesus of Nazareth celebrated the Passover Seder Supper on the night he was betrayed. But the Messiah transformed that Supper and its meaning by saying, as he took the unleavened bread (matzos) before the meal, “This is my body which will be given up for you" – instead of the traditional words, “Ha lakma anya…” (“This is the bread of affliction which our fathers ate in the land of Egypt”). Then Jesus and his disciples apparently ate the traditional Passover meal of roasted lamb in the usual way, reclining at table.

 

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9715-7/20/17

Janice died on Good Friday of this year. The morning before Janice died, while I was visiting my grandchildren and their mom, my daughter said, “Tommy has an important question. I thought NiNi would have a good answer.” On cue, my four-year-old grandson asked, “Why is Good Friday called ‘good’ if it’s the day they killed Jesus?”

 

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9714-7/6/17

I was driving home from work on a two-lane highway when a few cars in front of me slowed and stopped as a car ahead was turning left. I braked, but saw the car behind me was not slowing down in time to stop. The impact from the car rearending mine caused my glasses to fly off, but I was unhurt. When I exited the car, the other driver, a young black man asked, “Are you all right? I’m so sorry. I didn’t know you were stopping. It happened so fast.” I assured him I was okay. 

 

By: Father Douglas K. Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9713-6/22/17

As I write this message, I have tears in my eyes. I have just returned from the Ogeechee Area Hospice, where my friend, Father Mike Smith, has been staying since Tuesday morning, June 13. He had been so frail at Mass on Sunday, that his friend, Father Tom Nellis, the celebrant, had to bring Holy Communion to Father Mike in his pew. The next day, they hosted a Jesus Caritas group of priests, who prayed over Father Mike and anointed him (again). That evening, he collapsed and could not get up, so Tuesday, he was taken to hospice.

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9713-6/22/17

“Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me.” This refrain echoes from my childhood. But, as is often the case with popular “proverbs,” there’s no truth in the statement. The pain of a verbal attack can endure long after physical injury has healed. 

 

While most people with compassion are quick to denounce physical attacks, some hesitate when they witness verbal abuse. We make excuses for the abuser: “He’s just joking.” “She’s speaking out of anger.” “He didn’t really mean it.” “She’s being misinterpreted.”

 

By: Father Brett Brannen
Originally Appeared in : 9713-6/22/17

Perhaps you have read the article “Surprising Mercy” by Christopher West in the book “Beautiful Mercy,” which was given to all of our parishioners at Easter. Excerpts from the article:

 

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