Commentary

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9720-9/28/17

I was walking into church the Sunday that Hurricane Irma was predicted to hit Florida. My path to the door happened to coincide with another parishioner's, and we made small talk as we walked toward the entrance. 

 

 "It's a shame about the hurricane," I said. "I feel for those poor people in Florida. I hope it's not as bad as they predict."

 

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9719-9/14/17

Scenes of the devastation in Houston and its surrounding area have served as an opportunity for Americans, regardless of their political affiliations, to unite. We are always at our best as a country when responding to a crisis. Victims of Hurricane Harvey include members of every social class, race, ethnicity, and gender. At least for now we are united in our attempts to help them in their long, grueling, and expensive recovery.  

 

By: Father Douglas Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9718-8/31/17

James Henry Shank was born on April 24, 1830 in Rectortown, Fauquier County, Virginia, the son of John Henry Shank and Mary (“Polly”) Mann. His family was of German extraction on both sides. Both families were Quaker in religion and therefore anti-slavery, although his parents had obtained a household slave, Nathaniel.

 

By: Mary Hood Hart

“The heart of a Christian, who believes and feels, cannot pass by the hardships and deprivations of the poor without helping them.” Saint Luigi Guanella 

 

By: Father Douglas Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9717-8/17/17

On January 26, 1900, Theodore Roosevelt wrote a letter to Henry L. Sprague, which included this famous sentence: “I have always been fond of the west African proverb, ‘Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far.'” Although scholars have tried in vain to trace this proverb back to its source in west Africa, it expresses T.R.’s unique essence. By 1900, the future U.S.

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9717-8/17/17

I’ve been buying a lot of produce lately, particularly greens. We all know how expensive produce can be, so to save some money, I recently visited a large Asian market. The prices on produce are the best around. I’ve shopped at this market in the past, and I’ve felt a bit overwhelmed. There are so many products with which I’m unfamiliar. Yet each time I visit, I feel more acclimated. 

 

By: Father Douglas Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9716-8/3/17

The Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for Children in London was the beneficiary of a generous gift from Sir J. M. Barrie in 1929: the rights to his masterpiece, Peter Pan. The adventures of the “boy who never grew up” have bankrolled GOSH’s rise to the status of one of the world’s most renowned children’s hospitals. Ironically, GOSH played a key role in blocking the parents of Charlie Gard from seeking treatment elsewhere so that their little boy might have one last chance to grow up.

 

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9716-8/3/17

As we Catholics know, being pro-life means much more than just preventing women from having abortions. As one who’s been involved in the pro-life movement over the years, I’ve witnessed firsthand the care and concern crisis pregnancy centers have offered women who find themselves in dire straits. Indeed, without such help, a pro-life movement would be strictly legalistic, without heart.

 

So it makes sense that those who are pro-life will want to ensure that pregnant women and their babies are provided the best possible medical care. 

 

By: Father Douglas Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9715-7/20/17

According to Saints Matthew, Mark, Luke and Paul, Jesus of Nazareth celebrated the Passover Seder Supper on the night he was betrayed. But the Messiah transformed that Supper and its meaning by saying, as he took the unleavened bread (matzos) before the meal, “This is my body which will be given up for you" – instead of the traditional words, “Ha lakma anya…” (“This is the bread of affliction which our fathers ate in the land of Egypt”). Then Jesus and his disciples apparently ate the traditional Passover meal of roasted lamb in the usual way, reclining at table.

 

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9715-7/20/17

Janice died on Good Friday of this year. The morning before Janice died, while I was visiting my grandchildren and their mom, my daughter said, “Tommy has an important question. I thought NiNi would have a good answer.” On cue, my four-year-old grandson asked, “Why is Good Friday called ‘good’ if it’s the day they killed Jesus?”

 

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