Faith Alive

By: Shemaiah Gonzalez (CNS)
Originally Appeared in : 9824-11/22/18
Advent, the four-week period preceding Christmas, is a time to slow down as we wait in hopeful expectation for Christ’s coming. It’s a time to take stock of what’s important in our lives, casting away extra commitments and wasted energy we’ve added throughout the year.
 
Here are a few traditions that an individual or a family can practice to slow down and draw closer to Christ during Advent.
 
— Advent candles
 
By: Cecilia A. Moore (CNS)
Originally Appeared in : 9823-11/8/18

From the 1920s through the 1960s more than 300,000 African-Americans across the country chose to enter into communion with the Roman Catholic Church. Their choices to become Catholic set them apart from most African-American Christians who were members of Baptist, Methodist, Pentecostal and Holiness traditions.

 

By: Father Geoffrey A. Brooke Jr. (CNS)
Originally Appeared in : 9822-10/25/18

The rosary simultaneously manages to be one of the easiest and the most difficult prayers of the Catholic Church. Easy because it was developed to simplify the Gospels and contains the most commonly known prayers, the Hail Mary and Our Father. Difficult because it is so easy to get distracted while repeating the same prayers over and over.

 

By: Gretchen R. Crowe (CNS)
Originally Appeared in : 9821-10/11/18

It was one of those days you never forget. Sitting on the beach one summer evening last year, my husband and I decided to pray the rosary. Close by on a blanket was our son, only 8 weeks old. As we started praying out loud, our son began to coo along with every word.

 

Maybe he didn’t know their meaning, but he sensed the rhythm of every Our Father, Hail Mary and Glory Be. That was my first lived experience of the rosary’s power as a family prayer.

 

By: Moira McQueen (CNS)
Originally Appeared in : 9820-9/27/18

The concept of “synodality,” originally applied to bishops meeting together to discuss church teaching, has become increasingly important and extended since the Second Vatican Council.

 

St. John Paul II emphasized that “a synodal assembly cannot be reduced to a consultation on practical matters. Its true raison d’etre is the fact that the church can move forward only by strengthening communion among her members, beginning with her pastors.”

 

By: Kristin Colberg (CNS)
Originally Appeared in : 9818-8/30/18

The topic of “synodality” has generated rich conversation in recent years, especially since the election of Pope Francis. This term can seem foreign or technical, but in reality it refers to a practice that is both ancient and fundamental to the church’s life.

 

The word “synod” comes from the Greek, “synodos,” which can be rendered as “traveling on a journey together” (“syn” means same, “hodos” means road or way).

 

By: Kurt Jensen (CNS)
Originally Appeared in : 9817-8/16/18

Are Catholics more accepting of science than adherents of other religious groups?

 

Yes, an in-depth 2017 survey (1,927 respondents, including 1,010 Catholics) indicated.

 

However — and it’s a big “however” — it’s not an overwhelming difference. Catholics can be just as inconsistent as other adherents when it comes to seeing conflicts between faith and science.

 

By: Effie Caldarola (CNS)
Originally Appeared in : 9816-8/2/18

Any parent who ever grappled with the “new” math knows that education often falls victim to the latest trend.

 

But one growing trend in Catholic education is actually taking students back to what’s enduring and unchanging, according to Catherine Neumayr, who just completed seven years as principal of Holy Rosary Academy, an independent Catholic classical school in Anchorage, Alaska.

 

By: Effie Caldarola (CNS)
Originally Appeared in : 9815-7/19/18

Joe Young spent last summer on a mission trip to Magadan, a city in the Russian Far East, where an American priest serves a parish on the site of a former Stalinist labor camp

“It was the most impactful summer I’ve ever had,” Young said. “It was life-changing.”
Miles away, another Joe, this one a retired attorney, traveled last year to Honduras on a medical mission trip run annually by Creighton University and their campus parish in Omaha, Nebraska

By: Father Curtiss Dwyer (CNS)
Originally Appeared in : 9814-7/5/18

The pope was a patriot. The year was 1983, and Poland was under martial law. St. John Paul II, making his second pastoral visit to his homeland, upon reaching the airport tarmac bent forward and kissed the ground. He remarked during the arrival ceremony that the kiss had a special meaning for him. 

 

“It is like a kiss placed on the hands of a mother, for the homeland is our earthly mother,” he said. He said he considered it his “duty to be with my compatriots in this sublime, yet difficult historical moment of our homeland.”

 

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