features

By: Rita H. DeLorme
Originally Appeared in : 9903-1/31/19

Newly ordained in 1920, young Father Gerald P. O’Hara luckily had sufficient family backing to undertake an extended European tour. That his travels took him to many places in the world that he really wanted to learn more about is evident in photos he diligently took as he traveled through Europe and the Middle East. These early views of what O’Hara observed and learned have been carefully preserved in the Archives of the Savannah Diocese and offer a preview of his future career: one that eventually extended far beyond the state of Georgia. 

 

By: Rita H. DeLorme
Originally Appeared in : 9902-1/17/19
No doubt about it. Radio in the 1930s was the television and internet of today. It was a “bully pulpit” (to quote President Theodore Roosevelt) through which the American public could be reached. Catholics of average means in the Savannah (later Savannah-Atlanta) Diocese could be influenced by well-qualified and relatively unqualified radio speakers alike. One popular radio homilist was Father Charles Edward Coughlin, pastor of the Church of the Shrine of the Little Flower in Royal Oak, Michigan.
By: Jessica L. Marsala
Originally Appeared in : 9825-12/6/18

In 2019 the Sisters of St. Mary of Namur celebrate their 200th anniversary of responding to suffering by helping youth and the poor, whether through teaching and formation or through a number of different social justice ministries. 

 

By: Rita H. DeLorme
Originally Appeared in : 9824-11/22/18
It is, of course, an old story. Members of my family often explained who the “Masons” were and why Catholics never joined that fraternal group. Neither my father, his brothers, or his Catholic co-workers could even consider becoming Masons. Why? The explanation was simple. They couldn’t become Masons without risking excommunication from the Catholic Church. Usually, the discussion went no further. Our parents were busy and, being average kids, we soon lost interest in the subject.
By: Michael J. Johnson
Originally Appeared in : 9823-11/8/18

SAVANNAH--"Faith takes discipline,“ said Kevin Iocovozzi. "Just like driving, there is a lot of information coming at you and you have learn to settle in and pay attention to what is important."

 

A 1979 graduate of Benedictine Military School in Savannah, Iocovozzi began racing cars about 10 years ago. He says, “I think every young boy thinks about going fast. Out here we go fast and are safe.” Drivers must attend and pass racing school before they can get a license to race. 

 

By: Rita H. DeLorme
Originally Appeared in : 9823-11/8/18

This much was known about him. He was killed in a practice lap for the 1908 Grand Prix Automobile Race held in Savannah.

 

By: Michael J. Johnson
Originally Appeared in : 9822-10/25/18

They knew each other for a long time as they both have children with special needs. While volunteering at the the Adult Center in Hinesville, they discovered they are both Catholic and members of St. Stephen First Martyr Church in Hinesville. 

 

Marilyn Williams and Berta Ganaway are each caregivers for an adult child with Down Syndrome. They are parents first says Williams, but their children require extra care, and it can become difficult. Their conversations led them to form a group called Tender Loving Caregiving (TLC) 

 

By: Dara West
Originally Appeared in : 9822-10/25/18

When you plant a seed, you never really know with certainty how or when or what it will actually grow into. All you can do is put the seed in the ground, water it and have faith that a healthy plant will grow. Phil Wetherington had a vision of a community garden at Sacred Heart Parish in Warner Robins and had faith his vision would someday come to fruition. Phil, a master gardener, saw vacant land on the church property and dreamed of using that land to grow fresh vegetables for people in need.

By: Rita H. DeLorme
Originally Appeared in : 9822-10/25/18

Savannah’s St. Vincent’s Academy, founded in 1845 by the Sisters of Mercy, has a long and impressive history. Possibly no part of that history could ever again be as colorfully recorded as the Academy’s valedictory ceremony described by an imaginative Savannah Morning News reporter in a 1904 edition of the paper. 

 

By: Jessica L. Marsala
Originally Appeared in : 9820-9/27/18

More than 80 volunteers from parishes, schools and ministries throughout the Savannah Deanery lent a “helping hand” to Catholic Relief Services and Rise Against Hunger during their joint meal packaging event Sept. 22.

 

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