features

By: Rita H. DeLorme
Originally Appeared in : 9813-6/21/18

Father Patrick J. Peyton didn’t originate the saying, “The family that prays, together stays together” in the late 1940s when the Family Rosary Crusade began, though he might as well have. Certainly, the devout, Irish-born priest now up for sainthood had a profound effect on laity and religious alike when he began his dedicated campaign to encourage families throughout the world to take time each day to pray together and, especially, to say the rosary.

 

By: Rita H. DeLorme
Originally Appeared in : 9811-5/24/18

He had what might be called the “misfortune” of following one dynamic, colorful Savannah prelate (Bishop Benjamin J. Keiley) and of preceding yet another equally memorable one, Bishop Gerald P. O’Hara. A lesser man might have felt challenged.

 

By: Rita H. DeLorme
Originally Appeared in : 9810-5/10/18

In the first decade of the 20th century the Catholic Church, as well as many of its affiliates, was subject to actual prejudice. In Georgia, where Catholics still constituted a real minority in many areas, this was more often the rule than the exception. At the forefront of opposition to this type of discrimination was the Bulletin of the Catholic Laymen’s Association of Georgia. Editorials appearing in the earliest editions of the CLA publication kept Georgia Catholics informed about what was then going on.

 

By: Jessica L. Marsala
Originally Appeared in : 9809-4/26/18

ROBERTA--White paint emerged from the paintbrushes, bottles and rollers in their hands, transforming the rainbow of color beneath, now dry.

 

Though harmless on paper, these colorful words and designs — now covered, crossed out or rewritten — represented the long list of concrete fears, insecurities and questions that troubled their collegiate minds and that of their peers.

 

By: Rita H. DeLorme
Originally Appeared in : 9809-4/26/18

It was 1925 and Bishop Benjamin J. Keiley’s time was running out. He was retired, ill, blind and going deaf. This visit from Richard Reid, youthful editor of the Georgia Bulletin of the Catholic Laymen’s Association, would be memorable. The bishop’s illness had kept him hospitalized for some time in Atlanta’s St. Joseph Infirmary, run by the Sisters of Mercy.

By: Michael J. Johnson
Originally Appeared in : 9808-4/12/18

(Click on the image below to view a 2-page PDF)

More coverage of the Easter Triduum can be found here at our Smugmug gallery.

By: Jessica L. Marsala
Originally Appeared in : 9808-4/12/18

SPRINGFIELD--The first time that Nicole Knight set foot in St. Boniface Church in Springfield was November 7, 2015, the day she said goodbye to her father, who had passed away a little more than a week earlier.

 

This wasn’t the last time, however. 

 

By: Rita H. DeLorme
Originally Appeared in : 9808-4/12/18

Change is inevitable, even in the naming of a diocese. Like a child — evolving from infancy to maturity — who picks up nick-names along the way, the Catholic Diocese of Savannah has experienced its own name changes. Earlier, part of the Charleston Diocese, the Catholic Diocese of Savannah first stood officially on its own two feet in 1850. A bastion of Catholicity, it would hold onto both its premier position and its original name until the mid-1930s when new Bishop Gerald P. O’Hara recognized the potential of that up-and-coming city in Fulton County named Atlanta. 

 

By: Rita H. DeLorme
Originally Appeared in : 9807-3/29/18

One of the country’s youngest prelates in 1936 when he became bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Savannah, Gerald P. O’Hara soon had ideas of his own about educating Catholic boys during those early post-Depression Era years. Meanwhile, another dynamo, President Franklin D. Roosevelt already had similar plans, but on a national level. Through Roosevelt’s program, known as the Civilian Conservation Corps, young men of the 1930s could obtain employment by preserving national landmarks and public property.

By: Rita H. DeLorme
Originally Appeared in : 9804-2/15/18

The Diocese of Savannah’s Cemetery Preservation Society, still existing today, owes its origin to the efforts of then-archivist Gillian Brown, retired surgeon Frank Rizza, and others inspired to do something for it. Opened by first bishop, Francis X. Gartland when Catholics couldn’t obtain a separate burial section at Laurel Grove Cemetery, the cemetery is sanctified not only by graves of two bishops but also by those of countless priests and sisters who labored in the diocese.

 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - features
Go to top