features

By: Rita H. DeLorme
Originally Appeared in : 9723-11/9/17

Face it, he was meant for fame. Young and vigorous and an outstanding athlete and student, Richard B. Sheridan should have gone places, and he certainly did. His family was proud of him and had every reason to be. He would be starring in the October 24, 1931 game between Army (West Point) and Yale University. Earlier, the Augusta footballer had been named a corporal of cadets, the highest honor possible for a second classman. On that fateful fall day, Cadet Sheridan was – as always – performing well. Only this time, the effort he expended resulted in tragedy.

By: Sister Donna Loeper, CSJ
Originally Appeared in : 9723-11/9/17

I used to think I was big and strong. I competed on the Judo team in college. I ran in a few half-marathons. I backpacked on the Appalachian Trail for a week or more. Then I was surprised by a heart attack in 2012. I took things a little slower and more cautiously for a while, but with the help of cardiac rehab I returned to running and swimming in a few months.

 

By: Bill Norton
Originally Appeared in : 9722-10/26/17

Laura Cameron and Augusta’s St. Mary on the Hill Church share something unique: Both have passed their centenary, though Cameron has the distinction of being a year older.

 

By: Rita H. DeLorme
Originally Appeared in : 9722-10/26/17

It was truly a sad day in June 1939 when the Marist Brothers who had taught in Savannah for 20 years left town. They were moving to Augusta because the Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist could no longer afford to employ them during the financial crunch of the Great Depression. By 1939, things were improving, but money was still scarce, and there was still major unemployment. 

 

By: Staff
Originally Appeared in : 9721-10/21/17

Learn about Wynter Kelly, Director of Curriculum and Instruction; Jayne Stefanic, Director of Family Life; Amy Elkins, Director of Youth and Young Adult Ministry; and Maureen Coates, Director of Stewardship and Development.

 

Wynter Kelly, Director of Curriculum and Instruction

By: Rita DeLorme
Originally Appeared in : 9721-10/21/17

Some people considered him a Catholic evangelist. Certainly, his voice was unforgettable, and Catholics in Georgia, like the rest of the world, were privileged to hear it. Whether they heard it at a statewide Catholic Laymen’s Association convention or in their living rooms on their radios, or, even later on television, they paid attention to it. Monsignor (afterwards bishop and archbishop) Fulton J.

By: Jessica L. Marsala
Originally Appeared in : 9719-9/14/17

Approximately five months ago, the Diocese of Savannah launched its first podcast, “It’s Catholic Y’all.” 

 

Since then videographer Tim Williams, who describes himself as a storyteller, has produced seven episodes on a wide variety of topics including vocational discernment, theology of the body, youth ministry and Catholic identity. 

 

By: Rita H. DeLorme
Originally Appeared in : 9719-9/14/17

On September 11, 1959, when it officially opened with a Mass of the Holy Spirit, Saint John Vianney Minor Seminary located at Grimball’s Point on the Isle of Hope in Savannah, was termed by Most Father Thomas J. McDonough, the Auxiliary Bishop of Savannah, “the answer to prayers” for vocations to the priesthood. Few seminarians studying elsewhere to be priests of the Savannah Diocese were native Georgians. What Bishop McDonough wanted was a number of homegrown seminarians preparing to serve in the Diocese of Savannah.

By: Ellen Mongan
Originally Appeared in : 9718-8/31/17

The Georgia Right to Life dinner, “Southern Evening of Prayer, “was held at Aquinas High School, on August 19, 2017.  The first speaker, Gary Garner, author of “Swept up in the Spirit,” said that he was grabbed by the hand of God, and called to stand for the least of our brothers, the unborn.  Gary spoke about the deception women believe about abortion. He gave us a bird’s eye view of what often goes on behind the closed doors of abortion clinics.  A mother may leave her murdered baby behind, but the memory remains.

By: Jessica L. Marsala
Originally Appeared in : 9718-8/31/17

Americus--Ten years ago, Dick and Peggy Minor, now parents of three, realized that the secret to having a perfect family is to remember that families are completed not by man on his time or terms but rather with the help of the Holy Spirit.

 

After trying to conceive for eight years, Peggy miscarried twin boys approximately three months before her due date. When told that another pregnancy was out of the question, the Minors were understandably upset.

 

“It was heart-wrenching,” Peggy Minor said. 

 

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