Columns

By: Rachel Balducci
Originally Appeared in : 9907-3/28/19

Paul and I just got back from 10 days in the Holy Land, and my brain still can’t believe everything we saw.

 

By: Jason Halcombe
Originally Appeared in : 9907-3/28/19

The passenger van was all abuzz with talk of Lenten sacrifices the day before Ash Wednesday, but the big boys were leading the little ones astray.

 

“We could give up baths and school for Lent,” Noah and Simon said, garnering a pair of raised eyebrows from their mom in the driver’s seat.

 

By: Father Pablo Migone
Originally Appeared in : 9906-3/14/19

If you travel to Israel today, you will find a monastery built on a mountain from which you can see one of the oldest cities in the world, Jericho, continuously inhabited for 11,000 years. From the monastery you can also see the river Jordan where Jesus was baptized. This monastery, run by Greek Orthodox monks, marks the spot in the desert where every Lenten journey begins: with Jesus in the desert for 40 days.

 

By: Rachel Balducci
Originally Appeared in : 9906-3/14/19

The last of the five Balducci boys is now officially an altar server.

 

It has been a long time coming for Henry, our 11-year-old son, who has watched his four older brothers serve on the altar his entire life. 

 

By: Jason Halcombe
Originally Appeared in : 9906-3/14/19

Having a toddler race toward you with a Tinker Toy sword shouting “ninja” may sound harmless, but it’s more harrowing than you might think. Especially, when you’re certain he’s not only confident in his abilities, but also full of his mother’s follow-through for getting things done.

 

“No Isaac, no ninja,” I said.

 

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9906-3/14/19

On the surface, we Catholics may seem to contradict ourselves. On the one hand, we believe that, created in God’s image, all people are good and have inherent value. On the other hand, we are reminded on Ash Wednesday and throughout Lent that we are dust. Lent reminds us of our mortality, our sinfulness, and our need to repent. 

 

By: Father Pablo Migone
Originally Appeared in : 9905-2/28/19
On Sunday, Feb. 6, 1803, a Catholic priest arrived to Savannah and the small Catholic community requested that he celebrate Mass. Father Oliver Le Mercier had once been assigned to the parish church of St. John the Baptist in Savannah, founded just a few years before by newly arrived French-speaking Catholics who had fled both the Haitian Revolution to the south and the French Revolution to the east. These refugees fled fearing for their lives and became the first Catholic citizens of Savannah. 
 
By: Rachel Balducci
Originally Appeared in : 9905-2/28/19

Paul and I traveled to Savannah last weekend to join about a hundred other couples from our diocese who were celebrating Silver and Golden Jubilees. We made a weekend out of it with our good friends Bill and Kajse, who got married a few months before us so many moons ago.

 

By: Jason Halcombe
Originally Appeared in : 9905-2/28/19

The famous poet Robert Frost once wrote, “good fences make good neighbors,” but it could be said that “shirtless, wild boys sprinting through the yard with sticks make for no neighbors.” 

 

By: Father Pablo Migone
Originally Appeared in : 9904-2/14/19

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