Commentary

By: Father Douglas Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9715-7/20/17

According to Saints Matthew, Mark, Luke and Paul, Jesus of Nazareth celebrated the Passover Seder Supper on the night he was betrayed. But the Messiah transformed that Supper and its meaning by saying, as he took the unleavened bread (matzos) before the meal, “This is my body which will be given up for you" – instead of the traditional words, “Ha lakma anya…” (“This is the bread of affliction which our fathers ate in the land of Egypt”). Then Jesus and his disciples apparently ate the traditional Passover meal of roasted lamb in the usual way, reclining at table.

 

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9715-7/20/17

Janice died on Good Friday of this year. The morning before Janice died, while I was visiting my grandchildren and their mom, my daughter said, “Tommy has an important question. I thought NiNi would have a good answer.” On cue, my four-year-old grandson asked, “Why is Good Friday called ‘good’ if it’s the day they killed Jesus?”

 

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9714-7/6/17

I was driving home from work on a two-lane highway when a few cars in front of me slowed and stopped as a car ahead was turning left. I braked, but saw the car behind me was not slowing down in time to stop. The impact from the car rearending mine caused my glasses to fly off, but I was unhurt. When I exited the car, the other driver, a young black man asked, “Are you all right? I’m so sorry. I didn’t know you were stopping. It happened so fast.” I assured him I was okay. 

 

By: Father Douglas K. Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9713-6/22/17

As I write this message, I have tears in my eyes. I have just returned from the Ogeechee Area Hospice, where my friend, Father Mike Smith, has been staying since Tuesday morning, June 13. He had been so frail at Mass on Sunday, that his friend, Father Tom Nellis, the celebrant, had to bring Holy Communion to Father Mike in his pew. The next day, they hosted a Jesus Caritas group of priests, who prayed over Father Mike and anointed him (again). That evening, he collapsed and could not get up, so Tuesday, he was taken to hospice.

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9713-6/22/17

“Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me.” This refrain echoes from my childhood. But, as is often the case with popular “proverbs,” there’s no truth in the statement. The pain of a verbal attack can endure long after physical injury has healed. 

 

While most people with compassion are quick to denounce physical attacks, some hesitate when they witness verbal abuse. We make excuses for the abuser: “He’s just joking.” “She’s speaking out of anger.” “He didn’t really mean it.” “She’s being misinterpreted.”

 

By: Father Brett Brannen
Originally Appeared in : 9713-6/22/17

Perhaps you have read the article “Surprising Mercy” by Christopher West in the book “Beautiful Mercy,” which was given to all of our parishioners at Easter. Excerpts from the article:

 

By: Father Douglas K. Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9712-6/8/17

When I was a kid in Ohio, I experienced four distinct seasons each year: the harsh but beautiful snowy winters, the spring with its flowers and rain, the “lazy, hazy days of summer,” and the fall with the gorgeous foliage of deciduous trees. While each had its virtues, I definitely did not prefer the winters, largely because I was usually “under the weather” with colds, and a bit blue from the darkness of the skies.

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9712-6/8/17

Much focus in American society is given to winning. Elections, championships, competitions of all kinds. When someone wins the lottery, we uniformly celebrate. A win inspires us all to keep trying, against all odds.

 

We want to win wars, arguments, contests, prizes, sales, awards, praise, and respect. When we win, we feel vindicated. We feel affirmed in our abilities. We feel honored. We feel encouraged.

 

By: Father Douglas K. Clark
Originally Appeared in : 9711-5/25/17

Every year, Catholics spend over 90 days preparing for and celebrating the Paschal Mystery, the dying and rising of Jesus Christ: during the 40+ days of Lent, the three days of the Paschal Triduum and the 50-day Easter season that lasts through Pentecost, the dies pentecostes (“fiftieth day”). The Good News of Christ’s Resurrection is so good that Christians feast for 10 days more during the Easter Season than they fast during Lent! 

 

By: Mary Hood Hart
Originally Appeared in : 9711-5/25/17

In the more than 60 years I’ve lived, war, or the shadow of war, has been part of my life. A child of the 50s, as soon as I could speak, I pronounced “I like Ike,” a candidate my father, a World War II veteran, had met during his service and enthusiastically endorsed. 

 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Commentary
Go to top